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What is Turkish Hammam?

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Well, indoor baths were not something many do in the past. Therefore, the exact moment that individuals began taking indoor baths is unknown to historians. What historians do know however, is that the Ottoman Turks carried over the Asia Minor-based Roman bath not only culture wise but also architecture wise. They renamed it "hammam" after adapting it to Turkish preferences.  It is a place where cleanliness and relaxation go hand in hand. Here is a guide on taking a Turkish bath in the proper manner.

 

  • What to expect when planning your Turkish Hammam visit?

 Well, traditional hammams include separate, specific areas for men and women. However, both genders have similar bathing customs. In order to fully enjoy the hammam experience. You must place your trust in your tellak or natir, the male or female attendants who lead guests through the progressively hotter parts of the bath.

 Most Turkish Hammans provide a variety of services for customers, especially female customers, so you must decide which ones you want to use upfront. A typical Turkish bath comprises 45 minutes of cleaning, a foam wash, a massage, and traditional body scrubbing with a handwoven washcloth called a kese.


  • How should you prepare yourself before your Turkish Hamam visit?

Upon arrival, visitors are typically given a peshtemal, a tiny cotton towel to wrap themselves in, as well as a conventional towel to use after bathing. It is acceptable to bring your swimming suit or bikini, but it is not advised for the whole experience because few other people—and no Turks—will be wearing anything. Additionally, in almost all of Istanbul's historic baths, there is a dressing area where you can safely store your belongings.

 

  • The Turkish Hamam Real Experience?

As soon as you're prepared and ready to start, the bath attendant will lead you into the heated area. Next to a kurna, and a little marble basin, you may unwind and sweat at this location.

  • First, the attendant will perform the scrubbing step. Allow them to use the kese to scrub every square inch of your body while you sit back and unwind. Don't worry either; in the majority of classic hammams, marble panels divide the washing areas to provide a sense of seclusion. 
  • Second, after being cleaned, take a seat on the gobektasi, a heated marble slab in the hot area, where your attendant is waiting with a lacy, foam-filled towel for a sudsy massage.
  • Third, after this revitalizing encounter, the majority relax in the bath area. 
  • Fourth, the most impressive part of an old Turkish bath is the hot section. Typically, light from the high central dome filters into this area, illuminating the steam and giving the area an otherworldly feeling.


Just before you go, 


 

Many hammams will offer visitors a glass of sherbet, an Ottoman-style beverage, or a cup of Turkish tea after they return to the chilly area. The goal is to give your body a few minutes to return to its normal temperature.